FAQs

From here you will find answers to the most frequently asked questions across all our services. Using the filter simply choose either business or individual to access the complete range of services available. Can’t find the answer you are looking for? Contact us to discuss your query.

How many points will I get for being on my phone whilst driving?

A

As of 1 March 2017, the fixed point endorsement is six points.

I have been summoned to court for speeding what should I do?

A

Contact a member of our defence team immediately. Depending on the circumstances, the court may be able to deal with the case in your absence and we will be able to advise you accordingly. If your wish to avoid attendance, we will be able to assist with written representations on your behalf. If the speed is excessive or you have previous driving convictions, the court may demand your attendance if they wish to consider disqualification. We will prepare your case thoroughly to ensure the best possible outcome.

I have been arrested for drink driving, will I lose my licence?

A

Your licence will only be in jeopardy if you plead or are found guilty. Drink-driving carries a mandatory disqualification for a minimum period of 12 months, assuming you have no similar convictions within the last 10 years. It is a common misconception that personal issues, such as job loss, can be put forward to avoid a ban. This is NOT the case. In limited circumstances, evidence can be put to the court to establish that there are ‘special reasons’ as to why a ban should not be imposed. Such reasons must relate to the specific circumstances of the OFFENCE. These include issues such as emergency and shortness of distance travelled when there was no feasible prospect of you coming into contact with other road users.

Can I refuse to give my fingerprints?

A

No. On arrest, the police have the right to take your fingerprints and do not need your permission.

Can the police take my DNA?

A

Yes. On arrest, the police have the right to take your DNA and do not need your permission. The sample may, for example, be from a hair root.

What is a warrant?

A

A warrant is a document issued by a legal or governmental official authorising another body, usually the police, to make an arrest, search premises or carry out some other function relating to the administration of justice.

Can the police search my house?

A

The police have the power to enter your premises to affect an arrest and, in doing so, to search the house for evidence relating to the investigation in question. Once under arrest and detained, the police can search the house, on the authority of an officer of at least an inspector's rank, for evidence relating to the current or other offences.

How long can I be in police custody?

A

A suspect can generally be held for no longer than 24 hours in police custody prior to charge. The police should ensure that all detainees are processed as quickly as possible. Where it is deemed appropriate by an officer of at least a superintendent's rank, this period can be extended to a total of 36 hours. Whilst further extensions prior to charge can be allowed up to a maximum period of 96 hours, this has to be authorised by the court.

What is bail?

A

Where the police arrest a suspect, but wish to release him or her whilst the case continues, they can release him/her on bail. This can be before charge, whilst further enquiries are made, or after charge. If charged, the police must decide whether bail to a court date is appropriate. If not, the police must place the defendant before the first available court where the magistrates must decide whether to grant bail or remand in custody. Bail can be with or without conditions. Conditions can include residing at a fixed address, keeping away from witnesses and defined locations or regularly reporting to a local police station. Breaching conditions, re-offending, interfering with witnesses or failing to answer bail can result in a remand in custody until the case concludes.

What is ABH?

A

ABH stands for Actual Bodily Harm which reflects the injuries which are sustained as a result of this level of assault. Whilst relatively minor injuries could be classed as ABH, current charging guidance suggests that such injuries would be charged as the lesser offence of Common Assault. ABH will be charged if the injuries are deemed serious. In practice, this may be the case if injuries require a number of stitches or a hospital procedure under anaesthetic. The maximum prison sentence for an assault resulting in ABH is five years.

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